Denise de Pauw: The glass collecting job

Have you ever met anybody who enjoys applying for jobs?  Unlikely! Similar to the way in which  hospitals are associated with sickness, looking for a job is associated with either dissatisfaction or insecurity. I’m going to stick my neck out and suggest that online job applications are repetitively dull, or difficult, not to mention demotivating experiences, especially if done without a helping hand. Nevertheless, they are the norm- a norm which has also been actively embraced and expanded by government employment policy, which seeks to use digital employment services as a lever to “get people online”.

My research focuses on the experience of migrants looking for jobs online, something that all benefits claimants in the UK have been mandated to do since the 2012 Welfare Act. I look at intersections between literacy practices and discourses in online job searches, to find out why, regardless of their education level, looking for work online appears to be difficult for many migrants. In my analysis, I look at job applications in separate but interconnected layers of talk, actions, resources, texts, discourses and underlying motivating activity. In this talk, I present an application for a glass collecting job as an instantiation of a literacy event, in which I challenge popular discourses about the ease and convenience of online job applications with the reality of my participant’s experiences.

Learn more about Denise De Pauw’s research with this YouTube video

Literacy in Education During Challenging Times: A virtual panel in recognition of International Literacy Day 8 September

University of Maryland Baltimore County has invited us (that means you!) to join their event on 8 September at 3pm UK time.

Proclaimed by UNESCO in 1966, International Literacy Day (ILD) is commemorated annually on the 8th of September to raise awareness about the essential role of literacy in human development.

ILD 2020 focuses on ‘literacy teaching and learning in the COVID-19 crisis and beyond’, drawing attention to how the global public health crisis exacerbates existing educational challenges and inequalities.  Panelists will discuss their research-based work on effective ways to foster literacy development, highlighting a range of interdisciplinary and collaborative initiatives that involve teachers, schools, and communities in shaping equitable spaces for learning.

Free Registration
To register e-mail  bbkimtesol@umbc.edu


Panelists
Francis M. Hult, PhD  Introduction: Sustainable Literacy
Education
Keisha McIntosh Allen, EdD  Just Teaching: Engaging Racial
Literacy During Distance Learning and COVID-19
Jennifer Mata-McMahon, EdD  How a Dual Language
Program is Supporting Biliteracy for ELLs in a Baltimore City
Public School
Kindel Nash, PhD  The Children Come Full: Toward
Culturally Sustaining Literacy Practices in Urban Communities
Tracy Irish, PhD  STEM Literacy: Integrating Content across
Science, Technology, Engineering and Math through Cross
Cutting Concepts, Collaboration, and Communication to
Develop Informed Citizens
Jiyoon Lee, PhD  A Collaborative Approach to Language
Assessment Literacy Development in the Midst of COVID-19
Mavis G. Sanders, PhD  Promoting Early Literacy Through
Research-Practice Partnerships: The Role of UMBC’s Sherman
Center for Early Learning in Urban Communities

COVID-19 Where to find authoritative scientific information?

There has been a considerable amount of publicity about false information circling about the coronavirus during the current crisis.  News stories have also featured information that, even from official sources, is sometimes contradictory.  That is perhaps understandable in these fast moving times.  UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), the umbrella of the research councils has moved extraordinarily fast and effectively to coordinate the work of various universities involved in researching the pandemic.

Get your facts straight about the science behind coronavirus and stay up to date with the latest information. #Covid19 #coronavirus

Coronavirus: the science explainedSocial1

 

Researching Early Childhood Literacy in the Classroom: Literacy as a social practice. New book written by Lucy Henning published

Uta Papen and I, the series editors of Routledge Research in Literacy, are very pleased to announce that the publication of this book by Lucy Henning.  We discussed her work back in August here. From the publishers’ description:

This volume demonstrates how the ethnographic approach to research demanded by a ‘Literacy as Social Practice’ perspective can generate fresh insights into what happens when young children engage with schooled literacy tasks.

Researching Early Childhood Literacy in the Classroom argues that the lived experience of young children encountering formal schooled literacy curricula should be the foremost consideration in educational reforms intended to improve rates of literacy acquisition in schools. To make this argument, the author suspends traditional concerns with ‘learning’ and ‘progress’ to concentrate on ‘practice’ and ‘meaning’ in a careful analysis of key classroom incidents. The author concludes that such insights suggest a need for re-considering the assumptions upon which educational policy rests.

This book will be of great interest to graduate and postgraduate students, researchers, academics, and libraries in the fields of Literacy Studies, Teacher Education, Education Policy and Applied Linguistics.

Lucy Henning is Senior Lecturer in English Education at the University of Roehampton. Before joining Roehampton, Lucy worked as a primary class teacher, school literacy lead and a literacy consultant for the Primary National Strategies.

“Making us proud: young children engaging with schooled literacy discourses” new article by Lucy Henning

Dr Lucy Henning, of Roehampton University, has shared with us this link to a free version of her latest article in the Cambridge Journal of Education.  (If the link has expired, write to Lucy.HenningATRoehampton.ac.uk).  Lucy has an book in production with the Routledge Research in Literacy series now co-edited by Uta Papen and myself. Her new book is called “Researching Early Childhood Literacy in the Classroom: Literacy as a social practice.”

Lucy writes, “I am currently doing some work on participant frameworks and young children’s in-class construction of literacy practices away from teaching adults. It similar to the work I did for my book, but now I am hoping to take a more in depth look at how the children organise their interactions as they reproduce their in-class peer culture. I am interested in exploring how far this process can actually be observed happening.

“I am drawing very much on the work of American linguistic anthropologists and ethnographers from the last century to inform this aspect of my work (Charles Goodwin, Marjorie Harness Goodwin, Erving Goffman) – I would be glad to make contact with colleagues whose current work is in a similar field.”

Julia Gillen