READ WRITE EASY: Research, practice and innovation in deaf multiliteracies Volumes 1 and 2 Open Access

https://library.oapen.org/handle/20.500.12657/51600
https://library.oapen.org/handle/20.500.12657/52174

We’re delighted to announce the open access publication of two volumes from the project “Peer to peer deaf multiliteracies: research into a sustainable approach to education of Deaf children and young adults in developing countries”. This ESRC funded project, led by Ulrike Zeshan of University of Central Lancashire (ES/P008623/1) ran from 1 July to 30 December 2020 and involved Julia Gillen and Uta Papen of the Lancaster Literacy Research Centre as co-investigators.

Volume 1: ┬áThis book is the first of two volumes on deaf multiliteracies based on research with deaf children and adults in India, Uganda and Ghana. Multiliteracies include not only reading and writing but also skills in sign language, drawing, acting, digitally mediated communication, and other modes. The book covers a variety of themes including the assessment of learners’ progress, pedagogical issues as seen from teachers’ perspectives, and issues related to curricula. Authors discuss, for instance, the use of multimedia portfolios for tracking the learning of deaf primary school children, the training needs of deaf teachers, and a collaborative approach to curriculum development. The book is of interest to both researchers and practitioners. In addition to four research chapters, it features four ‘innovation sketches’. These are reports of innovative practices that have arisen in the context of the research, and they are particularly relevant for practitioners with an interest in methodologies.

This volume includes the chapter “The storymakers mini-project: encouraging children’s multimodal writing” by Julia Gillen and Uta Papen, pp. 257-274.

Volume 2: This book is the second of two volumes on deaf multiliteracies based on research with deaf children and adults in India, Uganda and Ghana. Multiliteracies include not only reading and writing but also skills in sign language, drawing, acting, digitally mediated communication, and other modes. The book covers a variety of themes including learner engagement, classroom practice, capacity building, and education systems. Authors discuss aspects of learning such as the sequencing of different multiliteracies skills in the classroom, a gamified approach to English grammar, a sign-bilingual online environment, and the influence of visual materials on learners’ participation. Capacity building with young deaf professionals and a comparative discussion of deaf education systems in three countries also feature in the volume. The book is of interest to both researchers and practitioners. In addition to four research chapters, it features four ‘innovation sketches’. These are reports of innovative practices that have arisen in the context of the research, and they are particularly relevant for practitioners with an interest in methodologies.